Do I select I am not a protected veteran?

What does it mean when it says I am not a protected veteran?

Not a Protected Veteran: A veteran who meets federal and/or state definition to qualify as a veteran but is not in the protected class of veteran for employment, reemployment or benefits.

Should I answer I am not a protected veteran?

While we hope that you will choose to confidentially disclose your protected veteran and disability status, you are not required to do so. Whether you choose to disclose or not, your answers will be kept confidential and will not subject you to any adverse treatment.

How do I know if I’m a veteran?

A veteran is a former member of the Armed Forces of the United States (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) who served on active duty and was discharged under conditions, which were other than dishonorable.

What qualifies you for veteran status?

38 U.S.C. § 101(2) provides: The term “veteran” means a person who served in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released therefrom under conditions other than dishonorable.

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How do I know if I am an Armed Forces Service Medal veteran?

Veterans unsure of their status as a protected veteran might ask what qualifies as an Armed Forces Service Medal veteran? The best place to start is with a veteran’s DD Form 214. Any awards that have been earned while on active service will be listed on the 214.

What defines a protected veteran?

The government defines protected veterans as: Disabled veteran – those entitled to compensation under laws administered by the Secretary of Veteran Affairs or those who were released from active duty due to a disability. Recently separated veteran – those released or discharged from the army in the last three years.

Why do jobs ask if you are a veteran?

This requirement is to ensure that companies doing business with the government are not discriminating against veterans or protected veterans and that they’re taking active steps to recruit and hire them. Many companies who aren’t federal contractors are still serious about hiring veterans.

Is every military person a veteran?

This definition explains that any individual that completed a service for any branch of armed forces classifies as a veteran as long as they were not dishonorably discharged.

Can I call myself a veteran?

Yes, just recently signed legislation allows you to call yourself a Veteran. During the December 2016 transition period, President Obama signed H.R. 6416, a bill that says National Guard and Reserve retirees who had zero active duty time are now eligible to be referred to as Veterans.

Are you a veteran if you never deployed?

Now, under the new law, anyone eligible for reserve component retirement benefits is considered a veteran, said Krenz. “Anyone who has reached 20 years of service, even if they were never activated on a [federal] order for more than 180 days outside of training, will now be considered a veteran,” he said.

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Are you a veteran if you are still active duty?

Under US law, a veteran is defined as a “person who served in the active military, naval, air, or space service, and who was discharged or released therefrom under conditions other than dishonorable.” With this definition, those who are actively serving in the military do not fall under the category of a veteran.

What are the 4 types of veterans?

What is the difference between a combat, war, or peacetime veteran?

  • Combat Veteran. Every service member who meets the active duty requirement is a veteran, but combat veterans and war veterans are entitled to additional VA benefits other veterans do not receive. …
  • War Veteran. …
  • Peacetime Veteran.

Are you a veteran if you are currently serving?

You are considered a veteran if you are a person who has actively served in any service branch of the armed forces for a certain period of time, and was discharged for reasons other than dishonorable, as defined in Title 38 of the Code of Federal Regulations.